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1. What is Schengen?
2. The 90/180 Schengen rule.
3. Do I need a visa to enter the Czech Republic?
4. What is Blue Card?
5. At which Czech embassy abroad can I apply for a visa?
6. What is the difference between long-term visa and long-term residence permit?


1. What is Schengen?

Schengen, also known as Schengen area, is a territory with absence of border checks at the internal borders of its member states, compensated for by extensive cooperation and high Schengen standards set out rules in many areas. This cooperation includes police and judicial cooperation, visa and consular matters, and personal data protection.

At the moment Schengen consists of 25 member states:

22 EU member states – Austria, Belgium, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Hungary, Italy, Lithuania, Latvia, Luxemburg, Malta, Netherland, Poland, Portugal, Greece, Slovakia, Slovinia, Spain and Sweden.

3 non-EU states – Iceland, Norway, Switzerland.

Within this group of member states, it is possible for third country nationals to obtain visa to one of these countires - so called Schengen visa. This visa can be used to enter another Schengen member state.


2. The 90/180 Schengen rule

The so called „90/180 rule“ applies to all Schengen visas. This means that every third country national is allowed to spend 90 days within a period of 180 days within the Czech Republic/Schengen zone. Period of 180 days is counted from the perspective of intended entry - 180 days preceeding the intended entry. Once the allowance of 90 days within 180 days is used, third country national has to leave the Czech Republic/Schengen zone and is only allowed to return back on the first day of the following half a year period.

This rule does not apply to the third country nationals, who: (1) entered the Czech Republic/Schengen zone on the basis of a visa and extended their stay by obtaining another short-term visa limited for territory of the Czech Republic (this type of visa is issued only in exceptional cases), (2) will reside in the Czech Republic on the basis of a long-term visa/residence permit.


3. Do I need a visa to enter the Czech Republic?

The list of countries whose nationals do not need a visa to enter the Czech Republic corresponds with the EU legislation that sets list of states with visa-free regime for all EU member states. Visa exemptions apply only to short stays up to 90 days of non-profit nature.

  • ALBANIA3
  • ANDORRA
  • ANTIGUA AND BARBUDA
  • ARGENTINA
  • AUSTRALIA
  • BAHAMAS
  • BARBADOS
  • BOSNIA AND HERZEGOVINA3
  • BRAZIL
  • BRUNEI
  • CANADA
  • COSTA RICA
  • GUATEMALA
  • HONDURAS
  • CHILE
  • CROATIA
  • ISRAEL
  • JAPAN
  • MACEDONIA/FYROM3
  • MALAYSIA
  • MAURITIUS
  • MEXICO
  • MONACO
  • MONTENEGRO3
  • NEW ZEALAND
  • NICARAGUA
  • PANAMA
  • PARAGUAY
  • SAINT CHRISTOPHER AND NEVIS
  • SALVADOR
  • SAN MARINO
  • SERBIA2 3
  • SEYCHELLES
  • SINGAPORE
  • SOUTH KOREA
  • TAIWAN1
  • UNITED STATES OF AMERICA
  • URUGUAY
  • VATICAN
  • VENEZUELA
1 The exemption from the visa requirement applies only to holders of passports issued by Taiwan which include an identity card number.

2 Holders of Serbian passports issued by the Special Coordination Directorate in Belgrade are excluded from visa-free regime.

3 In case of citizens of Serbia, Montenegro, Macedonia/FYROM, Albania and Bosnia and Herzegovina visa-free regime applies only to holders of biometric passports.


4. What is Blue Card?

Blue Card is a dual document - work permit and residence permit in one. Unlike the Green Card, Blue Card is issued according to EU legislation and therefore can be used within the European Union. Blue card can be applied for by any non-EU national. It is however necessary that the applicant holds University degree or college degree (lasting at least 3 years). Another document that needs to be provided when applying for a Blue Card is a Labor Contract concluded for at least one year with guaranteed monthly income in the amount of 1,5 multiple of an average gross monthly income in the Czech Republic.


5. At which Czech embassy abroad can I apply for a visa?

On the basis of the public notice of the Czech Ministry of Foreign Affairs number 429/2010 a positive list of countries has been defined. Citizens of these countries can apply for a visa at any Czech embassy abroad. The list of countries is as follows:

  1. Albania,
  2. Andorra,
  3. Antigua and Barbuda,
  4. Argentina,
  5. Australia,
  6. Bahamas,
  7. Barbados,
  8. Bosnia a Herzegovina,
  9. Brasil,
  10. Brunei Darussalam,
  11. Canada,
  12. Costa Rica,
  13. Croatia,
  14. El Salvador,
  1. Guatemala,
  2. Honduras,
  3. Hong Kong,
  4. Chilske,
  5. Israel,
  6. Japan,
  7. Korea,
  8. Macao,
  9. Macedonia,
  10. Malaysia,
  11. Mauritius,
  12. Mexico,
  13. Monaco,
  14. Montenegro,
  1. Nicaragua,
  2. New Zealand,
  3. Panama,
  4. Paraguay,
  5. Saint Kitts and Nevis,
  6. San Marino,
  7. Seychellles,
  8. Singapore,
  9. Serbia,
  10. Tchaj-wan,
  11. United States of America,
  12. Uruguay,
  13. Vatican City State,
  14. Venezuela.


6. What is the difference between long-term visa and long-term residence permit?

In case you do not reside in the Czech Republic yet and you are in the process of applying for your first Czech visa at the Czech embassy, you will be applying for a visa above 90 days, so called long-term visa. This type of the visa is being granted by the Czech embassies for up to 365 days. When extending the long-term visa, this visa is changed to the long-term residence permit. And how do you recognize these two types from each other? Long-term visa (visa above 90 days) has a green colour, long-term residence permit is red-and-blue with a symbol of a bull in the middle of the sticker.